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Sub practice
Sub practice

Shale Gas Projects

Shale gas is now widely recognised as a potentially game-changing energy source in certain regions of the World.

However, shale gas exploration is not without controversy. Our team of EHS regulatory lawyers, have specific and practical expertise in advising on the developing regulatory frameworks governing shale gas across Europe. We advise on issues such as the:

  • strategic planning and management of projects
  • requirements for EHS permits including mining waste permits, environmental permits and greenhouse gas permits
  • planning aspects of a project
  • need for environmental impact assessment (and its scope)
  • negotiating with regulatory authorities
  • management of NGO and security risks (including the potential for Judicial Reviews (in the English courts))
  • pre-application stage of a project
  • obtaining relevant permits and licences
  • mitigating commercial risks arising from shale developments

News & insights

Landscape view of electricity pylons

News: 03 FEBRUARY 2020

Top rankings for A&O’s Projects, Energy, Natural Resources and Infrastructure group

A&O’s global Projects, Energy, Natural Resources and Infrastructure group has finished top of the IJGlobal and Dealogic league tables, making 2019 another highly successful year. 

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Publications: 27 JANUARY 2020

Updated Equator Principles Finalized

Updated Equator Principles with stronger standards and a broader scope were finalized in November 2019 and are set to come into effect in July 2020. 

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Publications: 17 DECEMBER 2019

European Green Deal: roadmap to a climate neutral Europe

On 11 December 2019, the new European Commission announced its much-awaited European Green Deal (EGD)1, which sets out a wide range of major policy and legislative proposals to transition Europe to be ‘climate neutral’ by 2050. 

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Publications: 19 OCTOBER 2018

Bank ordered to disclose suspicious activity reports to customer

Lonsdale v National Westminster Bank [2018] EWHC 1843 (QB) (18 July 20181)  A bank was ordered to disclose, to a customer, suspicious activity reports (SARs) that the bank had sent to the National Crime Agency (NCA) at the time of freezing the customer’s bank accounts. The bank’s arguments concerning confidentiality, tipping-off and prejudicing an investigation were unsuccessful. The court’s observations on the interplay between the SARs regime and the law on data protection, defamation and breach of contract will be of interest to all banks. 

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Recognition